The supreme aim of Zen

Now, according to Zen, enlightenment or Buddhahood – the supreme aim of Zen – is realized by seeing one’s true nature (kensho) or seeing Buddha (kenbutsu). As we saw earlier, the Heart Sutra presents this experience in terms of ‘clearly seeing one’s body-mind is empty.’ Above we saw how Dogen, with the help of Layman Read More …

Bicycles, penguins, bombs, bar mitzvahs

To clarify I will spell it out; mountains, shoes, walls, bacteria, stars, baseball games, sand, armies, bicycles, penguins, bombs, bar mitzvahs, oceans, bowling pins, soup ladles, and all other particular things, beings, and events in/of total existence-time are sentient beings, animated subjects, individual agents, doers, thinkers – persons. Accordingly, no dharma is more or less Read More …

Experiential Verification

Where the common view finds ‘inherent fallibility’ in the ‘all too’ human condition, Zen sees the ‘inherent fallibility’ of any ‘reason’ that asserts the inferiority of subjective knowledge or the superiority of objective knowledge. The Zen axiom ‘Enlightenment by oneself without a teacher’ (mushi dokugo) is not a doctrine, precept, or revelation to be discovered, Read More …